Johnstown flood

They were duped by the instigator - the rain. When they failed, six dams poured more than million gallons of water into the Conemaugh Valley Twenty million gallons were unleashed on Johnstown when the South Fork Dam burst in A phenomenal amount of rainfall -

Johnstown flood

Johnstown, located at the confluence of the Little Conemaugh River and Stony Creek, was 14 miles downstream from Lake Conemaugh, a reservoir turned recreational lake that was owned and maintained by the prestigious South Fork Fishing and Hunting Club.

The sporting club, which catered to a wealthy clientele from nearby Pittsburgh, included Andrew Carnegie and Henry Clay Frick on its membership rolls.

Johnstown flood

Lake Conemaugh was held back by the South Fork Dam, a large earth-fill dam that was completed by the club in Bythe dam was in dire need of repairs. Visit Website When several days of heavy rain struck the area in late Mayclub officials struggled to reinforce the neglected dam, which was under tremendous pressure from the swollen waters of Lake Conemaugh.

Most just took the same simple precautions they did when Little Conemaugh River flooded: They moved their belongings to the second story of their homes and settled down to wait out the storm.

Club officials on high ground watched awe-struck as 20 million tons of water went roaring down the valley toward Johnstown. The deluge swept through the communities of South Fork, Mineral Point, Woodvale, and East Conemaugh, accumulating debris, including rocks, trees, houses, barns, railroad cars, animals, and people, both dead and alive.

Citation Information

By the time it reached Johnstown, at 4: In a terrible swoop, the northern half of the city was swept away, sending some 1, demolished Johnstown buildings tumbling down with the roaring torrent.November 15, PM Johnstown's Flood of Power Over Truth and the Science Behind the Disaster.

Join us for this free book presentation! Neil Coleman, a geologist at the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown, has written a new book re-examining many of the established assumptions about the flood.

Johnstown flood

The Johnstown Flood (locally, the Great Flood of ) occurred on May 31, , after the catastrophic failure of the South Fork Dam on the Little Conemaugh River 14 miles (23 km) upstream of the town of Johnstown, Pennsylvania/5.

JOHNSTOWN FLOOD A new look at the Historic Johnstown Flood of by WALTER S MOTER FRANK.

The Johnstown Flood by David McCullough

The article below appeared on pages of CIVIL ENGINEERING (May ) in edited form and has been cited by the National Park Service (US Dept of the Interior)..

On May 31,, a wall of rushing water three stories high struck the city of Johnstown Pennsylvania. Narrated by Richard Dreyfuss and directed by Mark Bussler, Johnstown Flood, tells the story of the massive flood that destroyed the town of Johnstown, PA, on May 31, %. The Johnstown Flood is one of those true stories of history where it takes a tragedy to occur before the masses truly respect nature and mankind’s limits.

There’s lots to see and do in Johnstown!

In short, a man made lake is built on a highly elevated area - mainly as a recreational spot for the very rich. The Johnstown Flood (locally, the Great Flood of ) occurred on May 31, , after the catastrophic failure of the South Fork Dam on the Little Conemaugh River 14 miles (23 km) upstream of the town of Johnstown, barnweddingvt.com dam broke after several days of extremely heavy rainfall, releasing million cubic meters of water.

With a volumetric flow rate that temporarily equaled the.

Johnstown Flood