Martin luther king jrs marcus garveys and malcolm xs fight for racial freedom and justice

Home Malcolm X and Martin Luther King A portrait of two different voices whose demands for black equality gave rise to gains in American civil rights. The full film is no longer available online.

Martin luther king jrs marcus garveys and malcolm xs fight for racial freedom and justice

Media archives was originally published in the Spring issue of YES! But his successes as an artist have never eclipsed his passion for justice and civil rights.

He served in the U. Throughout his life, Belafonte has been a tireless advocate of justice and human rights. The set, which also contains a DVD and a book illustrated by the renowned American painter Charles White, is a musical narrative of the history of African Americans.

Sarah Ruth van Gelder: Could you tell us the story of how this extraordinary collection came about? In the last half of the s when the new stirrings of the civil rights movement were coming into evidence, many of us had to examine what we thought we could contribute to this coming struggle.

I realized that most White Americans knew very little about our history and our struggle, and were having difficulty understanding the basis for our agitation and our resistance and our complaints.

I also discovered that while Black Americans had a sense of the beauty and tragedy of the journey from the time of slavery until now, we were not rooted in the specifics.

I thought one way to familiarize people with that history would be through the voices of the great folk artists.

The more I researched and listened to this music, the more I began to understand that it is one of the very few accurate documentations of the history of our journey. I delighted in the music of Africa, the earliest of the slave plantation songs, the transformation into Christianity and all that Christianity brought to the lives of the Africans who were forced to come here.

Martin luther king jrs marcus garveys and malcolm xs fight for racial freedom and justice

In this process, we also examined the tragic role the church played in the development of slavery and its role in helping develop tools for the resistance to slavery and ultimately its abolition. Although some of the material is familiar, few people understand the subtext of a lot of these songs and what the lyrics really say.

On the face of it, some of the words appear to be spiritually pure, when in fact much of it is really the language of rebellion, the language of resistance, language calling on the courage to overcome the oppression of slavery and racism.

I understand that you grew up in an urban setting, so rural black America was a new discovery. Yes, as far as America is concerned, but I grew up in a very rural environment on the island of Jamaica, and had a sense of the experience of slaves through slave descendents who were members of my family, who worked on the banana and the sugarcane plantations of the absentee landlords from England.

So my environment as a child prepared me to reflect on what it must have been like for slaves and the slave descendents to work the plantations of America. Who are some of the people you encountered and what was most meaningful about this discovery for you personally?

When I listen to many of the voices that sang these songs, the soulfulness with which they expressed themselves dimensionalizes for me the sense of how broad my own repertoire of songs could be.

As much as I understood about the music of the Caribbean—which some people view as exclusively my artistic voice—it is the folk music of the African diaspora, which includes America and the Caribbean and Brazil and all the nations of Africa, that enriches my own work.

The purity of purpose and the kind of passion Miriam Makeba and the great Calypsonian singers and the other artists I mentioned brought to their work is very, very different from the ways artists express themselves in pop culture.

Pop culture has none of the vibrancy that you find in the folk culture, where people speak directly to their own experience in the human condition. We had to go outside of that arena into places that were not so accessible to find blues artists and chain gang songs and other expressions that spoke to the suffering and the conditions of Black people.

Also very central to my own development was Woody Guthrie and the folk art of White America, and the kind of alliances that were made between Black and White people who were caught up in the working class struggle of this country, and indeed the world.

Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X met only once. On March 26, , the two black leaders were on Capitol Hill, attending Senate debate on the Civil Rights Act of Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther jr. and Jesse Jackson owed their rise to reception accord to them by blacks but Malcolm X it can be argued, gained his reputation as much from the distorted publicity he received from the white controlled media as from the endorsement of his black constituents (White, ). Night has day. Hard, soft. Hot, cold. If there was a Martin Luther King Jr., there had to be a Malcolm X. Martin Luther King, history remembers. Malcolm X, history tries to forget. But each man in his own way dominated the times in which he lived Malcolm’s earliest memory is that of waking in the middle of the night in a burning house.

What have these African American traditions taught the larger American society? We do it in the name of saving the values of our society, when the way we behave corrupts those values. We do it in the name of God in whom we believe, when in fact we have corrupted our own vision of the Christian journey.

A lot of this paradox expresses itself in The Long Road to Freedom. At the very beginning of the album you hear a sermon given by a White preacher to the slaves on the plantation. He twists the teachings of the Bible to preach subservience to the slave masters.

Then, bookending the collection, the philosophy of Christianity appears again, but this time used in a more enlightened, compassionate way that leads towards human freedom, as expressed by Dr. You quote Paul Robeson, who said that the purpose of art is not just to show life as it is, but also to show life as it should be.

What does this collection tell us about life as it should be? That the human spirit is resilient and that truth—no matter how long you abuse it and how long you try to crush it—will, as Dr.The civil rights leaders Dr.

Martin Luther King, Jr., and Malcolm X were two sides of the same coin. Both of them fought for equality and justice for African Americans. Both of them saw a need for immediate action in order to secure those rights.

The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., left, of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and fellow civil rights leader Malcolm X, heading a new group known as .

Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther jr.

Comparing The Life And Leadership Of Dr. Martin Luther King And Malcolm X

and Jesse Jackson owed their rise to reception accord to them by blacks but Malcolm X it can be argued, gained his reputation as much from the distorted publicity he received from the white controlled media as from the endorsement of his black constituents (White, ).

Explore barnweddingvt.com's group of famous civil rights activists, including leaders like Martin Luther King Jr., Harriet Tubman, Malcolm X, . The Civil Rights Movement Marches On. Learning Objectives. By the end of this section, you will be able to: Martin Luther King Jr.’s inspirational appeal for peaceful change in the city of Greensboro in , however, planted the seed for a more assertive civil rights movement.

Malcolm X (b) was raised in a family influenced by Marcus.

Martin Luther King's Most Inspirational Quotes

Martin Luther King, Jr., was a founder and the first president of the ___. A. similar to Marcus Garvey.

Martin luther king jrs marcus garveys and malcolm xs fight for racial freedom and justice

D. Chose a different method to try to achieve racial justice. Opposition to civil rights reform in the 's is best illustrated by. A.

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